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How to Find Your Twitter RSS Feed & Profile ID Number

Twitter RSS Feed

How to Find Your Twitter RSS Feed

 

Twitter has announced that it no longer supports or displays your Twitter feed on their site in plain view; however, there are many reasons you might want to continue to use it, say in a WordPress blog text widget that displays your latest Tweets. As you can see from the link below that the Twitter feed no longer works:

https://api.twitter.com/1/statuses/user_timeline.rss?screen_name=GlenWoodfin

However, if you want to add a Twitter feed to your WordPress blog in 2015, here is a work around to do it even after Twitter ending public access to their feeds: http://www.elegantthemes.com/blog/tips-tricks/how-to-add-a-twitter-feed-to-your-wordpress-website?utm_source=Elegant+Themes&utm_campaign=6444e6842f-RSS_EMAIL_CAMPAIGN&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_c886a2fc0a-6444e6842f-50192549

 

Below is the original post from 2011:

Simply substitute your Twitter profile name where my name (glenwoodfin) is.

You can also replace your Twitter Profile ID number as well if you know it.

https://twitter.com/statuses/user_timeline/15793787.rss (This feed is now broken as of January 2013)

 

Twitter may block all access to feeds as of March 2013:

https://dev.twitter.com/docs/faq#11716.

 

Some searchers may have found this post when searching for ‘how to find your Twitter RSS feed url‘ or ‘how to find my Twitter timeline’. These are one in the same.

If you wish to find your Twitter Profile ID number, go to: http://idfromuser.org/ and type in your Twitter account name. Mine is: glenwoodfin.

If the site above is down, which it is from time to time, I suggest you try: http://www.idfromuser.com/ as an alternative to find your Twitter profile id number.

When the sites don’t seem to be working, instead of trying to figure out your numerical id, just use your Twitter profile name instead since it gives you an rss feed with the same content:
https://api.twitter.com/1/statuses/user_timeline.rss?screen_name=put-your-Twitter-account-name-here .  Mine is: https://api.twitter.com/1/statuses/user_timeline.rss?screen_name=GlenWoodfin. Forget the number id!

If you wish to show your Twitter RSS feed on your website that automatically displays your latest Tweets, there are several ways you can do this. This post is created on WordPress blog software and it comes with a free default plugin/widget that lets you copy and paste your Twitter RSS feed url in it and it will instantly display in the sidebar.

To find this RSS widget, login to your WordPress dashboard and look down the left side to locate the ‘Appearance’ category. When you click on it, you’ll see the ‘Widgets’ tab, click on that and you’ll see the default RSS widget. Drag and drop it into the sidebar area, then insert your Twitter RSS feed url in the form, click save then click publish. You can show any feed in this widget, it doesn’t have to be a Twitter feed. In fact, look down the right side of this page and you’ll see my Tweets displayed in the RSS widget. If you have a static website, you can do a Google search for ‘RSS widget’ and find free ones or reasonably priced ones. Some of the free ones have a link back to the designer’s site, so I’d take that out of the code if you wish to hold more link juice on your page or buy a premium one without a back link to the widget designer’s site.

To find your Facebook feeds, go here.

 

Google is making it harder and harder to find your YouTube channel RSS feeds, but you can still find it by substituting the name of your channel ID with mine (glenwoodfin), just use my example here: http://gdata.youtube.com/feeds/base/users/glenwoodfin/uploads?alt\x3drss\x26v\x3d2\x26orderby\x3dpublished\x26client\x3dytapi-youtube-profile.

 

Does Adding a Twitter Feed to Your Site Increase Page Rank?

 

You have to be careful when decoding anything a representative from Google says on this subject. Notice Matt Cutts doesn’t talk about the ranking power of always having fresh content on your site or whether there is an added ranking benefit to people staying longer on your site while they are reading your Twitter feed, he only talks about adding a Twitter feed to get links. A sticky site (one that keeps people on your site longer, thus minimizing the bounce rate) can be good for ranking even though it’s only a small factor in the Google ranking algorithm.

Matt Cutts only refers to one aspect of ranking, Page Rank, but there are well over 200 ranking factors in the Google algorithm. I say adding a feed is good for ranking all things being equal because it adds new content to your page every time you Tweet.

Google Page Rank is a number assigned to a web page that starts at 0 and goes all the way up to 10. The scale is largely based on the number of other sites that link back to your site and the Page Rank of those sites linking in. To increase one’s Page Rank by one digit, you have to increase the links coming in by 8 times. Each level is exponentially based by a factor of 8. This is an educated guess, but it’s proven to be a good rule of thumb. You can install a Page Rank checker add-on to many browsers like Firefox, or simply go to a site like PageRankCheck.net and you’ll be able to find what any page is ranked. Bare in mind that Page Rank is only one of the factors in determining where your site comes up in a search, but it’s a strong indicator.

If you Tweet about a subject relevant to your website, then I think it’s logical to conclude adding a Twitter feed to your site is a good thing. As an online reputation manager, I must have the edge over all other sites, especially major media like newspapers. I believe it will help in ranking even if the content of your Tweets is unrelated to your site, but it’s even better if your Tweets contain relevant content and keywords that have similar topics.

Please re-Tweet this, Google Plus, and share on Facebook if you’d like me to continue to share content that makes a difference in your SEO and web site traffic. It means the world to me.